Plum Island Long-Term Ecological Research Site

 

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Models

Modeling provides a powerful tool for synthesizing data and research, and providing the capability to predict responses of ecosystems to changing drivers.


Generalized Estuarine Metabolism Model
This model couples an aggregated food web model with a 1D, tidally averaged, advection-dispersion transport model and is being used to examine different nutrient and organic matter loading scenarios on estuarine food web dynamics.

2D Hydrodynamic Model
A 2D hydrodynamic model is being developed for the Plum Island Estuary. A diffusive wave approach is used to simplify the hyperbolic PDE and to couple in subsurface processes. The hydrodynamic model will drive a 2D advection-dispersion model that governs estuarine biogeochemistry. This work is on going.

 

Sweeney Creek, one of the long-term experimental tidal creeks, at high tide. Point mouse over for a portrait of the man behind the models!

PIE-FVCOM 3D Hydrodynamic Model
Development of FVCOM for the Plum Island Estuaries that is coupled to the coastal zone and the Merrimack River. FVCOM is a 3D, primitive-equation, finite-volume hydrodynamic model developed by Changsheng Chen at UMass Dartmouth (see FVCOM). Liuzhi Zhao (UMass Dartmouth), Joe Vallino (MBL) and Changsheng Chen are the primary developers of PIE-FVCOM.

 

Data Assimilation Modeling
Data assimilation is a technique in which data collected from field observations or experiments are used to improve model performance.
Some examples applied to biogeochemical modeling are: Microbial Food Web and Estuarine Metabolism.

 

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Cooperative Agreement #OCE-9726921, #OCE-0423565, #OCE-1058747, #OCE-1238212. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in the material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.